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Standard 2 Aspect F

Standard 2f: Program completers engage in professional practice in educational settings and show that they have the skills and abilities to do so in a variety of additional settings and community/cultural contexts. For example, candidates must have broad and general knowledge of the impact of culture and language on learning, yet they cannot, within the context of any given program, experience working with the entire diversity of student identities, or in all types of school environments. 

Candidate preparation includes first-hand professional experience accompanied by reflection that prepares candidates to engage effectively in different contexts they may encounter throughout their careers.


Data Sources & Analysis

Data Source 1

Exit Evaluation of Professional Objectives -- Coordination

Description of Data Source:
During their second semester of their field placement (EHD 155B), candidates are expected to complete professional objectives in six key areas as a way of developing the knowledge and expertise needed to be a successful Ag Educator. Their progress gets monitored on the Exit Evaluation of Professional Objectives. Each time the candidate accomplishes one of the stated objectives, their mentor teacher initials the checklist near the date to verify that the objective was accomplished. Mentor teachers provide university coaches with feedback on each candidate’s performance in regard to meeting expectations for the exit objectives.

Perspective Captured from Data Source: Candidate and Mentor Teacher

Rationale for using Data Source:
The coordination objectives call for the candidate to participate in administrative coordination, supervise entrepreneurial supervised agricultural experience programs (SAE’s), supervise placement SAE’s, plan and conduct SAE visits, and supervise students at off-campus activities. Candidates collaborate with their mentor teacher, the parents of their students, and student work site supervisors to provide high quality agricultural experiences for their students in “real world” settings.

Specific Elements of Data Source:
Total score for number of Coordination objectives met.

Definition of Success for Each Element:
Candidates are asked to complete as many of the coordination objectives as they can. The expectation is that candidates will complete all five of the coordination objectives. Some candidates may not complete all five items due to various circumstances. Mentor teachers provide university coaches with feedback on each candidate’s performance in regard to meeting expectations for exit objectives.

Displays of Analyzed Data:

Table 1:  Cohort Mean Scores for EHD 155B Exit Evaluation of Professional Objectives -- for Six Coordination Objectives

Semester N Curriculum/
Instruction
Manage-
ment
Guidance Public Relations FFA Coordination
Fall 2019 13 14 5 5.85 4.92 2.85 4.77
Spring 2020 15 13.64 5.86 5.86 4.64 2.86 4.64
Fall 2020 17 13.94 5.82 6 5 2.88 4.59
Spring 2021 24 13.96 5.96 6 5 2.96 5

Link to Full Dataset:  EHD 155B Exit Evaluation of Professional Objectives

Interpretation of Data:
The table and data indicate that candidates fell short of completing the six coordination objectives.  Completion rates ranged between 4.6 and 5.0. This means that on average, candidates completed 4 to 5 of the professional competencies that were related to coordinating an agricultural program to ensure student learning. To some extent COVID-19, contributed to candidates’ inability to complete all six objectives. In the future, we will need to focus on these objectives to ensure candidates successfully complete all six.

Data Source 2

Professional Competencies: Out-of-Class Instruction and Supervision

Description of Data Source:
The observing and teaching agriculture classes competency requires candidates to obtain copies of course of study and teaching plans used by their mentor teacher during their first semester in their field placement (EHD 155A). They are to observe agriculture science and agricultural mechanics classes, observe class management methods including discipline, and take notes during observations and discuss with the mentor teacher. Candidates are also required to develop lesson plans for assigned classes and teach units of instruction as agreed upon with the mentor teacher.

Perspective Captured from Data Source: Candidate and Mentor Teacher

Rationale for using Data Source:
The out-of-class instruction and supervision competency requires candidates to observe and assist in supervised practice programs and to observe and assist in Future Farmers of America (FFA) activities. Candidates must collaborate with their mentor teachers, students' parents, placement site supervisors, school administrators, and regional supervisors to accomplish these two competencies.

Specific Elements of Data Source:
Total Score for Out-of-Class Instruction and Supervision Competencies met

Definition of Success for Each Element:
Candidates are asked to complete both of these competencies. The expectation is that candidates will complete both competencies. Some candidates may not complete both items due to various circumstances. Mentor teachers provide university coaches with feedback on each candidate’s performance in regard to meeting expectations for professional competencies.

Displays of Analyzed Data:
Table 2: Cohort Mean Scores for Two Out-of-Class Instruction and Supervision Professional Competencies

Professional Competencies Fall 2019
N = 13
Spring 2020
N = 15
Fall 2020
N = 21
Spring 2021
N = 10
Getting Established in the School 10.92 10.38 10.92 10.90
Discovering Community and Student Needs in Developing Ag Ed Programs 6.92 5.75 6.84 6.80
Observing and Teaching Agriculture Classes 6.92 6.93 6.96 7.00
Out-of-Class Instruction and Supervision 2.00 1.94 2.00 2.00
Guiding, Counseling, Selecting, and Placing Pupils 3.00 2.25 3.00 3.00
Organizing, Administering, and Maintaining a Department 11.00 10.44 10.69 10.60

Link to Full Dataset: EHD 155A Professional Competencies

Interpretation of Data:
All but one candidate completed both competencies. In spring 2020 one candidate completed only one of the competencies. Overall, however, these findings indicate the program does prepare candidates to collaborate with professionals--their mentor teacher, community members, etc.--in a professional setting.

Data Source 3

Professional Competencies: Guiding, Counseling , Selecting, and Placing Pupils

Description of Data Source:
The observing and teaching agriculture classes competency requires candidates to obtain copies of course of study and teaching plans used by their mentor teacher during their first semester in their field placement (EHD 155A). They are to observe agriculture science and agricultural mechanics classes, observe class management methods including discipline, and take notes during observations and discuss with the mentor teacher. Candidates are also required to develop lesson plans for assigned classes and teach units of instruction as agreed upon with the mentor teacher.

Perspective Captured from Data Source: Candidate and Mentor Teacher

Rationale for using Data Source:
The professional competencies for Guiding, Counseling, Selecting, and Placing Pupils require candidates to determine the standards and procedures of selection of pupils for the agriculture department, determine methods used to locate and interest prospective pupils, and confer with the guidance staff regarding the services and policies of the school and the guidance responsibilities of the agriculture teacher. Mentor teachers explain the importance of the methods they use to interest prospective pupils and the relationship between selection and having students that have positive attitudes for agricultural instruction. The mentor teacher also teaches candidates how they use guidance techniques to provide students with positive teacher-pupil relationships. The interest and attitude of students is important for creating a positive learning environment.

Specific Elements of Data Source:
Total Score for number of Guiding, Counseling, Selecting, and Placing Pupils Competencies met.

Definition of Success for Each Element:
Candidates are asked to complete as many of the three competencies as they can. The expectation is that candidates will complete all three competencies. Some candidates may not complete all three items due to various circumstances. Mentor teachers provide university coaches with feedback on each candidate’s performance in regard to meeting expectations for professional competencies.

Displays of Analyzed Data:

Table 3: Cohort Mean Scores for Three Guiding, Counseling, Selecting, and Placing Pupils Professional Competencies

Professional Competencies Fall 2019
N = 13
Spring 2020
N = 15
Fall 2020
N = 21
Spring 2021
N = 10
Getting Established in the School 10.92 10.38 10.92 10.90
Discovering Community and Student Needs in Developing Ag Ed Programs 6.92 5.75 6.84 6.80
Observing and Teaching Agriculture Classes 6.92 6.93 6.96 7.00
Out-of-Class Instruction and Supervision 2.00 1.94 2.00 2.00
Guiding, Counseling, Selecting, and Placing Pupils 3.00 2.25 3.00 3.00
Organizing, Administering, and Maintaining a Department 11.00 10.44 10.69 10.60

Link to Full Dataset:  EHD 155A Professional Competencies

Interpretation of Data:
All but one candidate completed all three competencies. In spring 2020 one candidate did not complete all three due to the cooperating school’s restrictions related to COVID-19. The fact that candidates work so closely with their mentor teachers to assist with the myriad tasks associated with being an agriculture educator suggests that candidates develop the collaborative skills necessary to facilitate productive collaborations once they enter their careers.

Next Steps:
Overall, the data analyzed to evaluate how well completers of our Agriculture Specialist program are prepared to engage in collaborations to support their professional learning suggest that they are well prepared. The professional competencies candidates are required to complete their first semester ask them to have productive collaborations with their mentor teachers as they take on the role of ag educators. These collaborations not only support their early development but also build relationships they are then later able to draw on once they begin their careers.

Moving forward, it would be beneficial for us to reach out to our completers to determine how well the program did prepare them in this specific area and to what extent they do draw on the professional relationships developed while in the program to support their ongoing development. We do know that the agriculture educator community within the region is small and that our completers do keep in touch with one another and with us. Our hope is that, as we believe and these data have supported, they do use these relationships to support their growth.

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